top of page
Shelf Top

journal.



Many people have a love-hate relationship with social media. On the one hand, it can be a great source of connection, creativity, information, and entertainment. On the other hand, it can bring up feelings of anxiety, insecurity, depression, and low self-esteem. While giving up social media completely is always an option, many people don’t want to do that because they enjoy the positive aspects of the apps. So, what’s a person to do? You don’t have to say goodbye to social media completely if you don’t want to. There are things you can do to make your social media experience more positive and beneficial. Here are five things you can do to protect your peace on social media.


1. Unfollow people or remove followers


You know those people you follow on social media whose posts always make you feel bad in some way? Maybe it’s an estranged friend, an ex-boyfriend, a random person from high school, or a stranger whose posts just rub you the wrong way. Unfollow them! On certain apps like Instagram, you can also “mute” people you’re following, which prevents you from seeing their posts without actually unfollowing them.

Additionally, social media apps give you the option to remove people from your followers list, so if a particular person is following you on social media and you wish they weren’t, you have the power to remove or block them.

You are in control of who you follow and who follows you on social media. Only let people into your social media bubble whose posts, interactions, or presence make you feel good or, at the very least, neutral.


2. Engage more

It’s easy to get in the habit of scrolling through social media without ever posting or commenting on anything. Using social media in this way can feel really isolating. Research actually shows that people who comment and connect with others are happier on social media than people who scroll without commenting. Real communities that care about and support each other can be formed on social media, but just as in “real” life, being part of a community is a two-way street and requires effort on your part.


3. Think before posting or commenting

Social media is filled with controversial and drama-filled posts. Commenting on posts like these might seem harmless, but before you know it, you’re knee-deep in a heated debate with another person. Needless to say, this kind of experience does not add to your peace. Before you comment, pause and take a minute to think about whether your comment will add or take away from your peace. Similarly, think about what you’re putting out into the world via your posts. Your feed can either be an encouraging place or a place that encourages trolls and arguments. It’s your choice!


4. Regularly check in with yourself Lastly, it’s important to regularly check in with yourself to see how you’re feeling about your social media use. If you’ve applied the above tips and still feel negatively affected by social media, that’s your mind’s way of telling you it’s time to take a step back. You could opt to take a social media break, limit the time you spend on it each day, or even deactivate your account if that’s calling to you. Always put your mental health first—it’s a million times more important than any social media post. Looking for in-person support?

If you’re struggling with your relationship with social media and/or feelings of low self-esteem, insecurity, anxiety, or depression, feel free to reach out to SoundMind Wellness to talk to one of our therapists. We’d be happy to support you in creating a healthier relationship with social media and addressing underlying feelings or patterns that may be contributing to your negative experiences.

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this page are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this post is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics, including but not limited to the benefits of mental healthcare, wellness and nutrition. It is not intended to provide or be a substitute for professional mental health advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is not a substitute for a relationship with a licensed mental health practitioner. Always seek the advice of your therapist, physician or other licensed mental health professional with any questions you may have regarding a mental health condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional mental health advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this page.

References:



As humans, we tend to place more importance on our physical health than our mental health. While taking care of your physical health is crucial, investing in your mental health is equally important. Even if you don’t suffer from a mental illness, staying on top of your mental health is an essential component of maintaining your well-being. Here are five ways you can invest in your mental health starting today!

1. Try meditation

With a growing body of evidence supporting its mental health benefits, meditation is gradually becoming more mainstream. Meditation is a mental exercise that helps you decrease rumination and become more present in the moment. When done consistently, meditation has been shown to actually rewire your brain for increased empathy, an enhanced sense of self, and an increased ability to cope with stress. Using a guided meditation app, such as Calm, Headspace, or Insight Timer, is a great place to start.

2. Pick up a hobby that excites you


Having a hobby that genuinely excites you can go a long way in supporting your mental health and well-being. Your hobby could be anything from physical activities like kickboxing or yoga to more sedentary activities like knitting or making jewelry. The options are endless so don’t be afraid to try out different things until you find something that truly brings you joy.

3. Take your sleep seriously

Research shows that sleep and mental health are intimately related. A lack of sleep can cause or worsen your mental health and, conversely, mental health issues can cause or worsen sleep issues. To best support your mental health, make sleep a priority. Put away electronic devices a couple of hours before bed and make it a point to go to sleep at a reasonable hour (between 10 and 11 p.m.). Invest in a good pillow and things like blackout curtains or a white noise machine, if needed. Don’t underestimate the power of deep, restorative sleep!


4. Eat well and exercise

Eating a nutritious diet and regularly exercising will not only support your physical health, but can also do wonders for your mental health. Focus on eating real, whole foods (with an emphasis on plant-based foods) and aim to move your body for at least 30 minutes a day. Exercise in nature and/or the sunshine for an added mental health boost!


5. Go to therapy Many people think that therapy is only for those with serious mental health issues or whose lives are falling apart. While therapy can certainly help in those cases, the reality is that the benefits of therapy extend far beyond periods of crisis. Therapy is about helping you feel confident in navigating your life and supporting you in becoming the best version of yourself. A good therapist can help you uncover things you may not even know are holding you back, guide you in making choices that make the most sense for you, and support you in processing difficult emotions (which we all have!).

If you’re ready to invest in your mental health, don’t hesitate to reach out to SoundMind Wellness today. We meet you where you are, supporting you in whatever chapter of life you’re in. Feel free to call us at (954)-613-9414 or fill out our online pre-screen questionnaire to get started.


The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this page are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this post is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics, including but not limited to the benefits of mental healthcare, wellness and nutrition. It is not intended to provide or be a substitute for professional mental health advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is not a substitute for a relationship with a licensed mental health practitioner. Always seek the advice of your therapist, physician or other licensed mental health professional with any questions you may have regarding a mental health condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional mental health advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this page.

References:



When you close your eyes and envision the woman you aspire to be, who do you see? What is that woman’s purpose? Becoming that woman is not an easy feat, but it’s entirely possible. It requires courage, perseverance, and a steadfast commitment to yourself. So, how exactly does a woman go about stepping into the person she dreams of being? Here are five tips to get you started.

1. Get your mind in the right place

The first step to discovering your purpose and becoming the woman you’ve always wanted to be entails tossing out the belief that certain things are impossible. Thinking that you can’t do certain things for one reason or another means you’ve given up before you’ve even begun. Instead of writing off goals and dreams because you think they’re unattainable, try to come up with ways that you could make them happen.

2. Set goals


The next step on this journey is to set goals. Write out your goals or tell them to someone you trust. It can also help to set mini goals, each with a goal date. If you’re not sure what your goals are, that’s okay, too! Have brainstorming sessions where you write out what you love, what your strengths are, and what the world needs. This can help you gain clarity about what direction you want to go. Don’t pressure yourself to figure it out though! As you go through life, your purpose often naturally makes itself clear to you.

3. Address insecurities

Many times, women don’t become the woman they aspire to be because their insecurities hold them back. They might think they’re not smart enough, pretty enough, funny enough, or any number of other things. Working through your insecurities can be challenging, but just may be some of the most important work you’ll do. It will allow you to pursue your passions and dreams with confidence and determination and will prevent you from self-sabotaging yourself along the way. The woman you wish to be is already within you—she’s simply waiting for you to have the courage to reveal her to the world.

4. Be willing to work hard While setting goals and getting your mind in the right place is crucial, those things don’t mean anything without putting in work. Becoming the woman you see when you close your eyes may be very challenging. There may be setbacks along the way and that’s okay. Don’t lose sight of your vision and keep moving forward.


5. Find support

Contrary to what you might think, you don’t have to walk this journey alone. While you are ultimately in charge of your mindset and actions, having a coach or therapist to support you along your journey can be incredibly helpful. Having someone to bounce ideas off of, offer you alternative points of view, or help you overcome mental hurdles is invaluable. At SoundMind Wellness, we help women just like you let go of their fear and insecurities so they can gain confidence and step into their purpose. If you’re ready to evolve into the woman you aspire to be, feel free to call us at (954)-613-9414 or fill out our online pre-screen questionnaire to get started.


The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this page are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this post is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics, including but not limited to the benefits of mental healthcare, wellness and nutrition. It is not intended to provide or be a substitute for professional mental health advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is not a substitute for a relationship with a licensed mental health practitioner. Always seek the advice of your therapist, physician or other licensed mental health professional with any questions you may have regarding a mental health condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional mental health advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this page.



bottom of page